The Edit Vol. 13 With Jenene Nagy, Gerd Lange, Fernanda Gomes And More

The internet is full of inspiration. Every day I discover beautiful art, design, and architecture – but often these little treasures get lost in the digital clutter. With ‘The Edit’ I want to share a carefully curated selection of outstanding artworks, stunning architecture, and inspiring designs that catch my eye in my daily research.

Let’s start right away with some art. The two following paintings are in beautiful contrast to each other – on one side, we have an abstract painting by Nicolas de Staël, and on the other side, a strict, monochromatic painting by Jenene Nagy. In the composition from 1950 by de Staël, we see irregular shapes severed by a striking vertical black stripe in the middle. The French painter was known for his highly abstract landscape images. Despite the many different shapes in the painting, the overall composition appears calm and harmonious.

In contrast, we have the black monochromatic, austere painting by the American artist Jenene Nagy. Barely recognizable in the darkness of the color are geometric, structured lines that seem to form a pattern. Nagy uses simple materials like paper and graphite to convey complex themes and impressions in her art.

Nicolas de Staël, Composition 1950, 1950 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2023, Image shot at Musée d'Art Moderne de Paris at the Nicolas de Staël Retrospective (15.09.23 - 21.01.24)
Image 1: Nicolas de Staël, Composition 1950, 1950 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, Image shot at Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris at the Nicolas de Staël Retrospective (15.09.23 – 21.01.24)
Jenene Nagy, mass 17, 2018, graphite paint and torn paper mounted on paper, ca. 83 x 83 cm. © The Artist
Image 2: Jenene Nagy, mass 17, 2019, graphite paint and torn paper mounted on paper, ca. 81,3 x 81,3 cm. © The Artist

Farmer Chair by Gerd Lange

Next, I would like to share with you the Farmer Chair by furniture and interior designer Gerd Lange. The chair, designed in 1965, is characterized by its minimalist design and clean lines. Eight solid wood slats form the basic frame, which is held together by wooden joints. The linen surfaces for the seat and backrest are then stretched into the construction. I always find it amazing that so many minimalist designs look so timeless.

I discovered the photos of this piece on the website of Various Objects, a Berlin showroom with a carefully curated selection of furniture and objects. More information here: https://variousobjects.co/farmer-chair-gerd-lange-bofinger

Gerd Lange, Farmer Chair, 1965, Wood, Cotton, 70×65×65 cm © Image Courtesy Various Objects
Gerd Lange, Farmer Chair, 1965, Wood, Cotton, 70×65×65 cm © Image Courtesy Various Objects
Gerd Lange, Farmer Chair, 1965, Wood, Cotton, 70×65×65 cm © Image Courtesy Various Objects
Gerd Lange, Farmer Chair, 1965, Wood, Cotton, 70×65×65 cm © Image Courtesy Various Objects
Gerd Lange, Farmer Chair, 1965, Wood, Cotton, 70×65×65 cm © Image Courtesy Various Objects
Farmer Chair by Gerd Lange, 1965, Wood, Cotton, 70×65×65 cm © Image Courtesy Various Objects

Residence in Cape Schanck by Studio Goss

I have to be honest and admit that I am very picky when choosing new interior/architecture projects. Especially interior designs are usually very personal and suit the respective resident. There are a few aspects that I like, but there is always something that I personally don’t like so much. However, this is not the case with the following project. The Cape Schanck House in Australia, designed by Studio Goss for Nicci Kavals, the founder of Articolo Lighting, is an excellent example of minimalist architecture characterized by a clean and functional aesthetic.

The house consists of two pavilions that integrate seamlessly into the surrounding landscape. At the heart of the house are the living area, the spacious kitchen, an open-plan dining and living room, and two outdoor terraces. In addition to the master bedroom, there are three guest bedrooms. High-quality materials and floor-to-ceiling windows contribute to the calm, balanced atmosphere.

The incredibly aesthetic photos by Timothy Kaye capture the beauty of Cape Schanck House perfectly. I found the project here.

Cape Schanck Residence, Studio Goss, Photography by Timothy Kaye
Cape Schanck Residence, Studio Goss, Photography by Timothy Kaye
Cape Schanck Residence, Studio Goss, Photography by Timothy Kaye
Cape Schanck Residence, Studio Goss, Photography by Timothy Kaye

Random Inspiration – Balance

The theme of the last compilation is balance. In art and design, balance is when visual elements such as lines, shapes and colors create a kind of stability in the composition. It influences the emotional impact of a work of art but also of a design, and can convey calm but also tension. In picture number 3 we see a harmonious composition by Brazilian artist Fernanda Gomes. The sculpture consists of three main components that are in a finely balanced relationship to one another. This balance of the composition creates a playful tension and radiates a natural harmony. Gomes works with everyday materials and creates most of her artworks directly in the exhibition space.

The next picture (No. 4) shows the “Phase” lamp by Japanese designer Baku Sakashita. The lamp is part of a collection of several lamps representing the phases of the moon. Each piece combines a round disc symbolizing the moon and an LED light connected by a filigree black arc. These two elements form a harmonious balance.

Image 3: Fernanda Gomes, Untitled, 2019, Driftwood, wood, stone © The artist, Image Courtesy Peter Freeman, Photo by Nicholas Knight
Image 3: Fernanda Gomes, Untitled, 2019, Driftwood, wood, stone © The artist, Image Courtesy Peter Freeman, Photo by Nicholas Knight
Image 4: Phase Lighting Collection By Baku Sakashita
Image 4: Phase Lighting Collection By Baku Sakashita
Image 5: Pierre Soulages, Peinture 65 x 92 cm, 26 Octobre 1961, 1961, Oil on canvas, 65 × 92 cm © The Artist, Image Courtesy Perrotin
Image 5: Pierre Soulages, Peinture 65 x 92 cm, 26 Octobre 1961, 1961, Oil on canvas, 65 × 92 cm © The Artist, Image Courtesy Perrotin

And the last picture (No. 5) for this edition features a small-format painting by French artist Pierre Soulages. Soulages uses bold, vertically and horizontally aligned black brushstrokes. How he has applied the paint suggests a certain randomness, yet the composition reveals an almost intuitive harmony and balance.

Aesence is an independent art and design publication dedicated to minimalist aesthetics. Founded out of a deep appreciation and fascination, Aesence aims to promote awareness and appreciation of minimalism in art and design.